Can Nutritional Balancing Cure Type-1 Diabetes?

“It might take up to a few years,” says Dr. Lawrence Wilson in his article on diabetes, “but [diabetes] usually responds to a nutritional balancing program.”

“Responds” felt a bit vague. So my wife emailed Dr. Wilson four and half months ago. Nicole specifically asked if type-1 diabetics who have followed his program were cured. His response is as follows:

“We don’t use the word ‘cure’ which is reserved for medical doctors.  However, several people with type-1 diabetes have reduced their insulin to zero and seem to be doing excellently.  So I feel it is possible if you will follow the entire program exactly as it is set up for you.”

Dr. Paul C. Eck, a mineral researcher, began developing nutritional balancing science in the early 1980s. Dr. Wilson apprenticed with Dr. Eck for 14 years. Since Eck’s passing, Wilson has continued and expanded upon his work. The program combines diet, supplementation, detoxification methods and lifestyle adjustments.

Nicole and I spent a month reviewing the abundance of detailed explanations, theories and case studies made available on drwilson.com. In April 2014, Nicole began working with Pam Marshall, a nutritional balancing practitioner and associate of Dr. Wilson.

Nicole has committed to following the program to the best of her ability for one year, as an experiment. We hope that it will not only allow her pancreas to produce insulin, but also repair systemic nerve damage, return her kidney function and heal her thyroid (amongst other common type-1 complications).

But will it “cure” diabetes? That’s not really the goal. The goal of nutritional balancing, as I understand it, is to get the body in a state where it can repair itself. It removes the toxic minerals, metals and chemical that have collected in the tissues. At the same, it replaces those toxins with the correct minerals needed by the body.

Once the body has undergone this type of transformation, producing insulin again should hopefully be no problem. At the very least we except it’ll improve every other area of Nicole’s health. She can live with diabetes (with the help of insulin and a low-carb diet) but she can’t live with complications like kidney failure and gastroparesis.

In future writings I’ll explain exactly what Nicole is doing on the nutritional balancing program. And we’ll of course share the results we see.

Sincerely,
John C. A. Manley

P.S. To read Dr. Wilson article on diabetes you can go to: Diabetes, A 21st Century Epidemic

P.P.S. And if you’d like to know how we’re financing the program check out: Curing Type-1 Diabetes on a Tight Budget

Previous: How to Keep Type-1 Blood Sugars Stable During the Night
Next: Emotional Eating, Stress and Type-1 Diabetes